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Wednesday, 6 February 2008

European Community

"When I am eight can I have a mobile phone please mummy? All of the boys at school have them... when they are eight. Just for emergencies. Pleeease mummy?"

"What sort of emergency can an eight year old boy possibly encounter?" I asked the tiny six year old man. "You are unlikely to need to call the RAC to help you with a broken down vehicle on the hard shoulder of the M1 now are you sweetie?" I laughed as I left him in the queue next to his perfect teacher (she really is a complete darling and Max has discussed marriage).

As I tottered off up the road towards the bus stop, I noticed two boys (too tiny to be teenage) from The Comprehensive School You Pay For greeting each other on the street with a kiss on each cheek. One boy presented the other with a large paper coffee cup and off they marched towards the school sipping their hot coffee (OHMYGOD!).

Damn the influence of the media on our young people, the outrageous oestrogenisation of the environment and our membership of the European Union. Our progeny are losing their innocence far too soon. I weep for the future of Dulwich.

Young lads such as these should be smoking and drinking Coca-Cola on their way to school like normal pre-teens.

19 comments:

Expatmum said...

The phones come ine very handy for girls when they are a bit older. Instead of talking endlessly about what they are going to wear, they simply put something on, take a photo on their phone and send it for approval!

aims said...

At eight? and with coffee??

I got my first phone when I hit 40 (something) and I didn't do coffee until I hit 50(ish)...Good Lord woman...what is happening over there?

dulwichmum said...

Darling Expatmum,

I am not quite so upset about the phone now to be honest - it is the coffee that shocks me! It is only a hop and a skip away from snorting crystal meth as far as I can see!

Sweet Aims,

No, actually the coffee drinkers must have been at least eleven, but even then - OHMYGOD! But then, Brenda says that she gave me tea in my bottle!

beta mum said...

Young people today - bah!
When chatting at work, if I mention a former drugs dealer I used to hang about with as a teenager who's now in prison, they look at me wide-eyed with shock.
What were they doing when they were kids? Knitting? Macrame? Sport?
I despair.

Rob Clack said...

Lol! I have given you an award. Please get Lydia to organise some sort of fancy dress for when you collect it from my blog!

dulwichmum said...

Sweet Beta Mum,

I am shocked! I was a Girl Guide and a member of The Legion of Mary as a child! OHMYGOD, how boring was I?

Lovely Rob,

I shall have to crack the whip with Lydia. I have no ability to cut and paste these lovely awards, and I love them so! Let me pop over to yours to see it, how exciting!

rain said...

If the coffee is from Starbucks, it isn't crystal meth one needs to worry about, more likely anorexia or the like. If the coffee is from the corner conveniance store - meth is definately next. I wonder if I could do a graduate thesis on this hypothesis?

dulwichmum said...

OHMYGOD!

mutterings and meanderings said...

The coffee tends to be more expensive than the phones...

Omega Mum said...

Don't worry. Those boys are clearly not English. Or they're doing a poncy remake of Grange Hill. Anyway, I have given you an award and I'd be delighted if you fancied popping over and collecting it.....

Retiredandcrazy said...

I have given you an award. Please see my post to collect it.

Dumdad said...

Crikey, you start 'em off young over there!

My son will be 14 in a few weeks' time and he hasn't got a mobile phone. He does borrow mine if he goes to a friend's alone so he can phone me when he gets there; of course, boys being boys, he forgets to phone me and I spend an hour or so revving up the panic meter as I phone my own mobile but get no answer because it's stuffed in his jacket that is out of his hearing. Eventually, I phone the parents and my son comes to the phone and says, "Sorry, I forgot."

P.S. I loved your last post featuring the two old crones on the bus. Priceless stuff.

debio said...

My daughter has had a mobile since she was seven and I packed her off to boarding school (only part-time being only a bit-part witch!).

The mobile was for me - not for her.

Recently sent her to Verbier with enough phone credit to call me for two hours, peak time daily but what does she do? Does she phone? Does she Hell. She's too busy; overwhelmed by the charismatic charms of a Spanish/Peruvian - son of a gold mine owner.

Clearly the mobile is for me, not her - she refuses to be ensnared by the cyber tagging.

And not a gold ingot in sight.....

DJ Kirkby said...

Lol! As always, my dear DM, LOL, LOl, LOL!

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Potty Mummy said...

DM, there's nothing to worry about - at least they paid for their coffee! (And as for the mobiles, by the time that Max gets his they will all have trackers in so you can find his whereabouts at the press of a button. More Big Brother than Big Mother, but still useful...)

Pig in the Kitchen said...

And they were gay as well! why else would they kiss? are you still living in the best quartier DM??!! ;-)

Maddy said...

Indeed, quite shameful! My daughter told me she needed an ipod, you know, coz all her friends have one. The list of new necessary gizmos is endless.
Cheers

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